16 Tech is an innovation district emerging on the northwestern edge of downtown Indianapolis. By 2030, the live-work-innovate community will have generated 3,000 jobs and invested $3 million to support resident-led projects in surrounding neighborhoods. Located in the historic Riverside neighborhood, between Indiana Avenue and the White River, 16 Tech is a 50-acre district where corporations, researchers, entrepreneurs, and innovators will converge to leverage their varied skill sets and resources.

In 2017, the Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation awarded a $2 million grant to support the innovation district’s start-up costs. In addition to the global corporations already headquartered in the district, 16 Tech has opened fully leased office space, an innovation hub, and the AMP, an artisan marketplace and food hall featuring new and established local offerings. It will also be home to additional office space, research labs, walking and biking paths, green space, and residential space.

16 Tech is focused on contributing to sustainable, equitable economic growth that includes neighbors, especially those who have been a part of the communities near 16 Tech for generations. 16 Tech prioritizes building relationships with residents and business owners in the surrounding community, while focusing on creating access and opportunity in the district. In 2020, the 16 Tech Community Investment Fund awarded $1 million to organizations focused on workforce training, business support, education, neighborhood capacity building, and infrastructure and beautification.

(*Portions of the video provided by 16 Tech Community Corporation/Aaron Milbourn)

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