Too few of Indianapolis’ Black and Latino students and students from low-income families enroll in and complete postsecondary education, which leaves them less prepared to succeed in our 21st century economy. Purdue University, in partnership with its College of Engineering, created Purdue Polytechnic High School (PPHS) to better prepare Black and Latino students and students from low-income families to succeed in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) careers. The innovative high school model combines personalized learning with project-based curriculum – including industry-focused experiential learning – that help bring careers to life for students. The intense program is designed to be a stepping stone to college or a direct pathway to a high-tech career for students from all backgrounds.

In 2017, the Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation awarded $1,250,000 to support the launch of PPHS and help develop the back-office capacity needed to scale the model. PPHS has now expanded to three campuses. The early results from the schools have been promising, and the first graduating class of 113 students included 48 students that were accepted into Purdue University, half of whom identified as Black or Latino.

Leave A Comment

Additional Posts

Why Lowering Nicotine in Cigarettes Could Help Save Hoosier Lives

Reducing the amount of nicotine in cigarettes may lead some current smokers to smoke more – at least in the short term. But there’s also evidence that reducing nicotine in cigarettes can help reduce smoking.

Introducing the Charitable Grants Program

Here’s how the new Charitable Grants program works. Each year, the Foundation identifies funding themes based on pressing needs in Indianapolis. These themes guide the selection of six Indianapolis organizations that are addressing these needs in our city. Organizations cannot apply to the Charitable Grants program, and the grants are awarded on a one-time basis.  

Indiana’s Shockingly Low Math Scores Should Serve as a Call to Action

Claire Fiddian-Green is the President & CEO of the Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation. On June 30, 2017, the Indiana Department of Education released the first draft of Indiana’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan for public comment. ESSA is the federal law for K-12 schools enacted in 2015 that replaced the federal law No Child […]

Grantee Spotlight: Project POINT Gives Hope to Patients Suffering from Opioid Use Disorder

Ellen Quigley is the Vice President of Programs at the Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation An Interview with Dr. Krista Brucker, Emergency Room Physician and Co-founder, Project POINT Background In 2016, the Richard M. Foundation awarded a $700,000 grant to support the expansion of an innovative program called Project POINT (Planned Outreach, Intervention, Naloxone and Treatment) […]